Posts

Dr. Imran Niazi, Dr. Kelly Holt

Dr. Imran Khan Niazi received his B.Sc. degree in Electrical engineering and his Masters in biomedical engineering. He received his PhD under the supervision of Prof. Dario Farina from Center of sensory-motor interaction, Health Science Technology Department, University of Aalborg, Aalborg, Denmark in 2012. After working as a postdoc for a year, he moved to New Zealand in 2013, where he is currently working as Senior Research Fellow at New Zealand College of Chiropractic.

Dr. Kelly Holt was a member of the 1998 inaugural graduating class of the New Zealand College of Chiropractic. Besides his chiropractic degree he also holds a Bachelor of Science majoring in physiology and a PhD in Health Science from the University of Auckland. His PhD focused on the effects of chiropractic care on sensorimotor function and falls risk in older adults. Kelly worked in private practice as a chiropractor for 10 years following graduation and has taught at the New Zealand College of Chiropractic since 2000 and is currently the Dean of Research at the College.

Please comment below if you have any questions for us during the interview. I might choose some of them for our conversation.

Podcast

Dr. John Srbely
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Listen to this great interview with Dr. John Srbely as we talk about his research interests in chiropractic, myofascial pain, myofascial trigger points and central sensitization.  Dr. Srbely is a researcher and Assistant Professor at the University of Guelph in the Department of Human Health and Nutritional Sciences.  He studies the physiologic mechanisms of myofascial trigger points and their role in the clinical expression and treatment of pain and joint/muscle dysfunction in chronic disease. A core theme to his research is the study of central sensitization which is a fundamental neuradaptive process associated with the pathophysiology of pain and disease.

Dr. Srbely’s research expertise and interests lie in the fields of clinical biomechanics and neurophysiology. He has a specific interest in the study of pain and joint function associated with aging and chronic disease such as osteoarthritis, myofascial pain and fibromyalgia. To this extent, he studies the physiologic mechanisms of myofascial trigger points and their role in the clinical expression and treatment of pain and joint/muscle dysfunction in chronic disease. A core theme to his research is the study of central sensitization. Central sensitization is a fundamental neuradaptive process associated with the pathophysiology of pain and disease, however, the impact of central sensitization on the physiologic expression of chronic myofascial pain and human mechanics/pathomechanics in chronic degenerative diseases such as osteoarthritis is poorly understood. Dr. Srbely’s research initiatives aim to develop novel/enhance existing treatment approaches in clinical pain management (diagnosis and treatment) and musculoskeletal biomechanics/pathomechanics associated with chronic diseases and aging.

 

Dr. Bernadette Murphy
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Listen to this great interview with Dr. Bernadette Murphy. This is an interview that all chiropractors and students will want to listen to! We talk about many interesting concepts such as the current state of neurophysiology research within chiropractic, neural adaptation in humans and the role of chiropractic adjustments in aiding the re-establishment of appropriate neuromuscular connections, how a chiropractic adjustment works and much more.  She is at the forefront of research regarding the neurophysiology of chiropractic.  Dr. Murphy graduated from Queens University in 1985 and the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College in 1989 before moving to New Zealand where she completed her MSc (1992) and PhD (1998) in Human Neurophysiology at the University of Auckland. She was a fulltime faculty member in the Department of Sport and Exercise Science from 1999-2007, where she established an MSc in Exercise Rehabilitation.  In January 2008, she returned to Canada and took on the role of Head of Kinesiology in the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT).  She is the Director of the Human Neurophysiology and Rehabilitation Laboratory. The overall theme of her research is neural adaptation in humans and the role of physical interventions such as spinal manipulation and exercise in aiding the re-establishment of appropriate neuromuscular connections.  She has previously been awarded the World Federation of Chiropractic best scientific paper award (1995) and 3rd prize in 2007; the New Zealand Chiropractor of the year (2004) and the 2010 Ontario Chiropractic Association award for most significant contributions to research.  She has supervised numerous award winning Masters and PhD students and received significant research funding in New Zealand, Australia and Canada.

 

Dr. Smith and Dr. Murphy at University of Ontario Institute of Technology

 Dr. Murphy and Dr. Smith at University of Ontario Institute of Technology