Podcast

In this episode, Dr. Jeff Hebert discusses back pain in young people, the link between back pain, health behavior and cardiovascular disease & sport participation as a health intervention. Jeff Hebert, DC, PhD is a Professor and the CCRF/NBHRF Chair of Musculoskeletal Health Research at the University of New Brunswick, as well as an Adjunct Professor at Murdoch University in Australia. Jeff’s career to date includes 18 years of experience in faculty, clinical, and administrative positions in Canada, the United States, and Australia.  Most recently, he was the Associate Dean (Research) in Murdoch University’s School of Psychology and Exercise Science. Previous appointments include positions as a Senior Lecturer of Rehabilitation Science (Murdoch University) and Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery (University of Utah). He has earned a Bachelor’s degree in Psychology (University of Denver) as well as a Doctorate in Chiropractic (Palmer College) and PhD in Exercise Science (University of Utah). He serves as an Associate Editor for the journal Chiropractic & Manual Therapies. Before pursuing an academic career, Jeff worked as an outpatient and hospital-based clinician in multidisciplinary environments including as pain medicine, sports medicine, and spine surgery.

View Dr. Hebert’s research publications at researchgate.net.

Here are the articles that we discussed in this episode of the chiropractic science podcast.

1. Pubertal development and growth are prospectively associated with spinal pain in young people (CHAMPS study-DK).
  Hebert JJ, Leboeuf-Yde C, Franz C, Lardon A, Hestbæk L, Manson N, Wedderkopp N.
  Eur Spine J. 2019 Feb 11. doi: 10.1007/s00586-019-05905-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  PMID: 30740638 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]
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2. The relationship of lumbar multifidus muscle morphology to previous, current, and future low back pain: a 9-year population-based prospective cohort study.
  Hebert JJ, Kjaer P, Fritz JM, Walker BF.
  Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2014 Aug 1;39(17):1417-25. doi: 10.1097/BRS.0000000000000424.
  PMID: 24859576 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]
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3. Physical activity is prospectively associated with spinal pain in children (CHAMPS Study-DK).
  Franz C, Møller NC, Korsholm L, Jespersen E, Hebert JJ, Wedderkopp N.
  Sci Rep. 2017 Sep 14;7(1):11598. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-11762-4.
  PMID: 28912463 [PubMed – in process] Free PMC Article
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4. The Prospective Association of Organized Sports Participation With Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Children (the CHAMPS Study-DK).
  Hebert JJ, Klakk H, Møller NC, Grøntved A, Andersen LB, Wedderkopp N.
  Mayo Clin Proc. 2017 Jan;92(1):57-65. doi: 10.1016/j.mayocp.2016.08.013. Epub 2016 Nov 16.
  PMID: 27865444 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]
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Dr. de Luca and I discuss her research on spinal pain in the elderly and chiropractic. Katie de Luca is a post-doctoral research fellow in the Department of Chiropractic at Macquarie University. She is a chiropractor in clinical practice, however her research focuses on the epidemiology and management of musculoskeletal conditions, with expertise in the elderly. In 2016 she was awarded her PhD from the University of Newcastle, School of Medicine and Public Health. Her thesis explored the experience of pain in women with arthritis, and resulted in substantial contributions to the fields of rheumatology, pain and ageing research. She has 25 peer-reviewed journal publications and more than 50 conference presentations, which includes several invited keynote presentations on back pain in the elderly. These have been at regional, national and international conferences in gerontology, pain, public health and chiropractic forums. She is on the editorial boards of Chiropractic and Manual Therapies and JMPT, and peer-reviews for another 13 journals. She has received several large competitive grants, most recently being awarded in excess of $400,00 in an industry led grant from the Australia Chiropractors Association to perform a longitudinal study on back pain in older Australians who present to a chiropractor for treatment of their low back pain. She has won many research prizes, including 1st prize at the World Federation of Chiropractic Biennial Conference in Washington DC (March, 2017). She is actively on the board for the Chiropractic Australia Research Foundation, and is the Research Chair for Sports Chiropractic Australia. She is one of only 13 CARL Fellows, a group which she is privileged to be a part of. She hopes to be a leading chiropractic researcher on spinal pain in the elderly.

View Dr. de Luca’s research at researchgate.net.

 

Here are the articles we discuss in this interview:

1. Qualitative insights into the experience of pain in older Australian women with arthritis.
de Luca K, Parkinson L, Hunter S, Byles JE.
Australas J Ageing. 2018 Sep;37(3):210-216. doi: 10.1111/ajag.12557. Epub 2018 Jun 26.
PMID: 29947165 [PubMed – in process]
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2. The Relationship Between Spinal Pain and Comorbidity: A Cross-sectional Analysis of 579 Community-Dwelling, Older Australian Women.
de Luca KE, Parkinson L, Haldeman S, Byles JE, Blyth F.
J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2017 Sep;40(7):459-466. doi: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.06.004. Epub 2017 Oct 13.
PMID: 29037787 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]
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3. Three subgroups of pain profiles identified in 227 women with arthritis: a latent class analysis.
de Luca K, Parkinson L, Downie A, Blyth F, Byles J.
Clin Rheumatol. 2017 Mar;36(3):625-634. doi: 10.1007/s10067-016-3343-5. Epub 2016 Jul 6.
PMID: 27383742 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]
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