Podcast

Dr. Brian Anderson

Dr. Brian Anderson DC, MPH, MS, PhD is an Assistant Professor within the Palmer Center for Chiropractic Research (PCCR) at the Palmer College of Chiropractic, where his research is focused on evaluation of nonpharmacological spine care delivery in the US. His background includes 15 years of clinical experience as a licensed chiropractic physician in a variety of settings, including private practice, a hospital-based integrative medicine center, and a chiropractic academic teaching clinic. He has also been an educator for the past 15 years, teaching courses at the undergraduate, graduate, and post-graduate level. With a passion to better understand and contribute to conservative spine care research, he enrolled in a PhD program in Health Sciences in 2015 with a focus on Health Services Research. His dissertation was titled “A Secondary Analysis Of Insurance Claims Data To Determine The Association Between Provider Type And Treatment Escalation In Musculoskeletal Disorders”, which is a topic he continues to investigate currently. In this interview, we discuss his journey from chiropractor to researcher, and several of his publications.

After graduating with his PhD in 2019, he joined the faculty at the Palmer Center for Chiropractic Research, where he participated in a pilot clinical study as a treating clinician, developed relationships with several research collaborators, and made progress towards developing his own research program.

Dr. Anderson’s research has been presented at many academic conferences, for which he has received several best paper awards. He is currently a co-investigator and primary analyst on a R15 grant titled “Spinal Manipulative Therapy vs Prescription Drug Therapy for Care of Aged Medicare Beneficiaries with Neck Pain”. He was recently awarded a 2-year Loan Repayment Award through the National Center for Complementary & Integrative Health (NCCIH), and also participated in the Fall 2022 cohort of the US Bone & Joint Young Investigators Initiative.

View Dr. Anderson’s publications at researchgate.net.

Here are the articles we discuss in this episode:

1.Risk of Treatment Escalation in Recipients vs Nonrecipients of Spinal Manipulation for Musculoskeletal Cervical Spine Disorders: An Analysis of Insurance Claims.Anderson BR, McClellan WS, Long CR.J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2021 Jun;44(5):372-377. doi: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2021.03.001. Epub 2021 Aug 6.PMID: 34366149
2.The Effect of Reduced Access to Chiropractic Care on Medical Service Use for Spine Conditions Among Older Adults.Davis M, Yakusheva O, Liu H, Anderson B, Bynum J.J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2021 Jun;44(5):353-362. doi: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2021.05.002. Epub 2021 Aug 8.PMID: 34376317 Free PMC article.
3.The Relationship Between Healthcare Provider Availability and Conservative Versus Non-conservative Treatment for Back Pain Among Older Americans.Anderson BR, Yakusheva O, Liu H, Bynum JPW, Davis MA.J Gen Intern Med. 2022 Mar;37(4):992-994. doi: 10.1007/s11606-021-06889-0. Epub 2021 May 24.PMID: 34031853 No abstract available.
4.Three Patterns of Spinal Manipulative Therapy for Back Pain and Their Association With Imaging Studies, Injection Procedures, and Surgery: A Cohort Study of Insurance Claims.Anderson BR, McClellan SW.J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2021 Nov-Dec;44(9):683-689. doi: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2022.03.010. Epub 2022 Jun 24.PMID: 35753873
Dr Frank Scali

In this interview, Dr. Scali discusses with me the upper cervical spine and myodural bridge (connective tissue between suboccipital muscles and the cervical spinal dura mater). Dr. Frank Scali grew up in Valley Stream, Long Island, New York, and studied Neuroscience at Stony Brook University. In 2009, he received his Doctorate in Chiropractic at Logan University in Chesterfield, Missouri. During his time in medical school, Dr. Frank Scali professionally prosected cadaveric specimens for Gray’s Anatomy and illustrated for multiple journals and textbooks, including the Oxford Handbook of Bariatric Surgery. While attending medical school, he published multiple non-variant anatomical findings in the medical literature and served as an Ad Hoc Reviewer in Journals such as The Spine Journal, The Anatomical Record, Surgical and Radiological Anatomy, and others. In 2018, he graduated with his MD from AUC School of Medicine with fifty-four publications, including textbook contributions and a patent for a medical device.

Dr. Scali is board certified in Chiropractic and Medicine. His current title is Assistant Professor of Medical Education and Anatomy at the California University of Science and Medicine. At CUSM, Dr. Scali serves as the Director of the ATLAS Lab Center, is the Director of the USMLE Board Preparation, and is the Course Director for MSK/Derm, Surgical Anatomy, and the Step 1/2CK Board Prep course. He was inducted into the Sigma Xi Scientific Research & Honor Society in 2020 and serves on the Editorial Board for the Journal of Medicine since 2019. As Assistant Professor of Medical Education, Dr. Scali has achieved dozens of teaching awards in Medical Foundations, MSK/Derm, Neuroscience, Reproductive Medicine, and Medical Board Preparation courses. Because of his innovative teaching style, in 2021, Dr. Scali became the inaugural recipient of the Robert Suskind & Leslie Lewinter-Suskind Pre-Clinical Faculty of the Year award.

Visit Dr. Scali’s research at researchgate.net and view his faculty page.

Here are the articles we discuss during this episode:

1.Anatomical connection between the rectus capitis posterior major and the dura mater.Scali F, Marsili ES, Pontell ME.Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2011 Dec 1;36(25):E1612-4. doi: 10.1097/BRS.0b013e31821129df.PMID: 21278628
2.Investigation of meningomyovertebral structures within the upper cervical epidural space: a sheet plastination study with clinical implications.Scali F, Pontell ME, Nash LG, Enix DE.Spine J. 2015 Nov 1;15(11):2417-24. doi: 10.1016/j.spinee.2015.07.438. Epub 2015 Jul 22.PMID: 26210227
3.Histological analysis of the rectus capitis posterior major’s myodural bridge.Scali F, Pontell ME, Enix DE, Marshall E.Spine J. 2013 May;13(5):558-63. doi: 10.1016/j.spinee.2013.01.015. Epub 2013 Feb 11.PMID: 23406969
4.The Posterior Atlantooccipital Membrane: The Anchor for the Myodural Bridge and Meningovertebral Structures.Scali F, Ohno A, Enix D, Hassan S.Cureus. 2022 May 30;14(5):e25484. doi: 10.7759/cureus.25484. eCollection 2022 May.PMID: 35686279 Free PMC article.
Dr. Carlos Gevers

Dr. Carlos Gevers joins me to discuss mechanisms of spinal manipulation, particularly as they relate to central sensitization and neuroinflammation. He also shares a study on Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha in Urine Samples of Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain Undergoing Chiropractic Care.

Carlos Gevers Montoro is a second-generation chiropractor. He graduated from Life Chiropractic College West in 2003 as Valedictorian and the recipient of the Clinical Excellence Citation award. After practicing for a few years in Spain and France, he was instrumental in the opening of the Madrid College of Chiropractic (MCC), where he still lectures. His contributions at the MCC were mostly related to the clinical sciences. In parallel, he served for seven years as the President of the Spanish Chiropractic Association, being involved in chiropractic politics and policy at the national and international level.

In 2018 he decided to switch gears and take a completely new path in the research arena. He started his PhD in Pain Neurosciences at UQTR – University of Montreal joint program under the supervision of Prof. Mathieu Piché. His PhD studies are partially funded, by a prestigious grant from the Government of Quebec. His line of research and his first publications are mostly focused on mechanisms of spinal manipulation, particularly as they relate to central sensitization and neuroinflammation. These two phenomena seem to be strongly implicated in the development of chronic pain syndrome and other conditions.

Check out Dr. Carlos Gevers researchgate profile page.

Here are the articles we discuss in this episode:

1.Presence of Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha in Urine Samples of Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain Undergoing Chiropractic Care: Preliminary Findings From a Prospective Cohort Study.Gevers-Montoro C, Romero-Santiago M, Losapio L, Conesa-Buendía FM, Newell D, Álvarez-Galovich L, Piché M, Ortega-De Mues A.Front Integr Neurosci. 2022 Apr 12;16:879083. doi: 10.3389/fnint.2022.879083. eCollection 2022.PMID: 35492573 Free PMC article.
2.Chiropractic Spinal Manipulation Prevents Secondary Hyperalgesia Induced by Topical Capsaicin in Healthy Individuals.Gevers-Montoro C, Provencher B, Northon S, Stedile-Lovatel JP, Ortega de Mues A, Piché M.Front Pain Res (Lausanne). 2021 Jul 20;2:702429. doi: 10.3389/fpain.2021.702429. eCollection 2021.PMID: 35295504 Free PMC article.
3.Neurophysiological mechanisms of chiropractic spinal manipulation for spine pain.Gevers-Montoro C, Provencher B, Descarreaux M, Ortega de Mues A, Piché M.Eur J Pain. 2021 Aug;25(7):1429-1448. doi: 10.1002/ejp.1773. Epub 2021 Apr 15.PMID: 33786932 Review.

In this episode, Dr. Meier discusses how people move differently in the presence of (or in anticipation of) pain. Changes in motor control may play an important role in musculoskeletal pain. His lab uses a cross-disciplinary approach that combines neuroscience and movement biomechanics to provide new insights into the role of potential interactions between movement behavior, psychological factors and supraspinal mechanisms in the development and maintenance of persistent low back pain. We’ll touch also on fear avoidance and pain related movement avoidance.  Dr. Michael L. Meier is a senior pain researcher and group leader at the Department of Chiropractic Medicine at the University of Zurich. He received his master’s degree in neuropsychology and his doctorate in cognitive neuroscience from the University of Zurich, focusing on the processing of pain and nociception in the brain. In 2019, he received a grant from the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNF) to study the role of movement behavior and cortical processes in the development and persistence of low back pain. A hallmark of his work is linking research from different disciplines such as biomechanics, neuroscience, and psychology, shedding light on novel interacting pathomechanisms underlying persistent low back pain whose pathoanatomical cause is often unclear.

Please see Dr. Michael Meier’s research profile at researchgate.net.  Further information and links to his research can be found at the Balgrist University Hospital website.

Below are the articles Dr. Michael Meier and I discuss in this episode:

1.
Fear-avoidance beliefs are associated with reduced lumbar spine flexion during object lifting in pain-free adults.
Knechtle D, Schmid S, Suter M, Riner F, Moschini G, Senteler M, Schweinhardt P, Meier ML.
Pain. 2021 Jun 1;162(6):1621-1631. doi: 10.1097/j.pain.0000000000002170.
PMID: 33323888 Free PMC article.
2.
Neural responses of posterior to anterior movement on lumbar vertebrae: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.
Meier ML, Hotz-Boendermaker S, Boendermaker B, Luechinger R, Humphreys BK.
J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2014 Jan;37(1):32-41. doi: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2013.09.004. Epub 2013 Nov 12.
PMID: 24229849
3. Identifying Motor Control Strategies and Their Role in Low Back Pain: A Cross-Disciplinary Approach Bridging Neurosciences With Movement Biomechanics.
Schmid Stefan, Bangerter Christian, Schweinhardt Petra, Meier Michael L.
Frontiers in Pain Research. 2021 Aug;(2):42. doi: 10.3389/fpain.2021.715219

Dr. William Reed is an Associate Professor in the School of Health Professions, Department of Physical Therapy at University of Alabama at Birmingham. He is the director of the Mechanisms of Spinal Manual Therapy Laboratory. His research is directed towards determining the peripheral and central mechanisms of spinal manipulation (manual therapy) for the treatment of musculoskeletal pain.  He is also the Interim Co-Director of the PhD program in Rehabilitation Science at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Here we discuss some of Dr. William Reed’s research starting with his introduction to research as a chiropractic student in 1994 then we’ll discuss his work with Dr. Joel Pickar, his K01 award topic, and progressing to his latest line of research on characterization of a rat LBP model and spinal mobilization mechanisms. 

See more of Dr. Reed’s research at researchgate.net.

The articles we discuss in this episode include:

1.
Chiropractic management of primary nocturnal enuresis.
Reed WR, Beavers S, Reddy SK, Kern G.
J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 1994 Nov-Dec;17(9):596-600.
PMID: 7884329 Clinical Trial.
2.
Relationship between Biomechanical Characteristics of Spinal Manipulation and Neural Responses in an Animal Model: Effect of Linear Control of Thrust Displacement versus Force, Thrust Amplitude, Thrust Duration, and Thrust Rate.
Reed WR, Cao DY, Long CR, Kawchuk GN, Pickar JG.
Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2013;2013:492039. doi: 10.1155/2013/492039. Epub 2013 Jan 20.
PMID: 23401713 Free PMC article.
3.
Paraspinal Muscle Spindle Response to Intervertebral Fixation and Segmental Thrust Level During Spinal Manipulation in an Animal Model.
Reed WR, Pickar JG.
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2015 Jul 1;40(13):E752-9. doi: 10.1097/BRS.0000000000000915.
PMID: 25856263 Free PMC article.
4.
Neural responses to the mechanical characteristics of high velocity, low amplitude spinal manipulation: Effect of specific contact site.
Reed WR, Long CR, Kawchuk GN, Pickar JG.
Man Ther. 2015 Dec;20(6):797-804. doi: 10.1016/j.math.2015.03.008. Epub 2015 Mar 27.
PMID: 25841562 Free PMC article.
5.
Spinal Mobilization Prevents NGF-Induced Trunk Mechanical Hyperalgesia and Attenuates Expression of CGRP.
Reed WR, Little JW, Lima CR, Sorge RE, Yarar-Fisher C, Eraslan M, Hurt CP, Ness TJ, Gu JG, Martins DF, Li P.
Front Neurosci. 2020 Apr 30;14:385. doi: 10.3389/fnins.2020.00385. eCollection 2020.
PMID: 32425750 Free PMC article.

 

Check out related chiropractic science podcasts on neurophysiology and the brain.

Martha Funabashi, is a PhD currently working as a clinical research scientist at CMCC. She is also a CARL fellow and the co-lead study coordinator of SafetyNET – an international and multidisciplinary research team to support patient safety among spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) providers. Martha has a Bachelor’s Degree in Physiotherapy and a Master’s Degree in Neuroscience from the University of Sao Paulo – Brazil. She completed her PhD in Rehabilitation Sciences at the University of Alberta under the supervision of Dr. Greg Kawchuk and her post-doctoral fellowship also at the University of Alberta with Dr. Sunita Vohra. Martha’s research interests and passion are on the SMT’s biomechanics, underlying mechanisms, force-time characterization and its safety aspects. Martha has 26 peer-reviewed scientific journal publications, over 40 conference presentations and is on the editorial boards for peer review journals, such as Chiropractic and Manual Therapies. Martha has won research prizes, including the New Investigator Award at the World Federation of Chiropractic Conference 2017 and works in collaboration with emerging and well-known researchers around the world.

Dr. Funabashi’s email is: MFunabashi@cmcc.ca

See Dr. Funabashi’s publications at researchgate.net.

Here is a list of the articles Dr. Funabashi and I discussed on the podcast.

1. SafetyNET Community-based patient safety initiatives: development and application of a Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Survey.
  Funabashi M, Pohlman KA, Mior S, O’Beirne M, Westaway M, De Carvalho D, El-Bayoumi M, Haig B, Wade DJ, Thiel HW, Cassidy JD, Hurwitz E, Kawchuk GN, Vohra S.
  J Can Chiropr Assoc. 2018 Dec;62(3):130-142.
  PMID: 30662067 [PubMed] Free PMC Article
  Similar articles
2. Tissue loading created during spinal manipulation in comparison to loading created by passive spinal movements.
  Funabashi M, Kawchuk GN, Vette AH, Goldsmith P, Prasad N.
  Sci Rep. 2016 Dec 1;6:38107. doi: 10.1038/srep38107.
  PMID: 27905508 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE] Free PMC Article
  Similar articles
3. Does the application site of spinal manipulative therapy alter spinal tissues loading?
  Funabashi M, Nougarou F, Descarreaux M, Prasad N, Kawchuk GN.
  Spine J. 2018 Jun;18(6):1041-1052. doi: 10.1016/j.spinee.2018.01.008. Epub 2018 Jan 31.
  PMID: 29355792 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]
  Similar articles

Geoffrey Bove, DC, PhD, and I discuss his research regarding inflammation within peripheral nerves, chiropractic principles, manual therapies, repetitive motion disorders and much more.  Dr. Bove is a graduate of Hampshire College, Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College, and the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.  He is currently a professor at the University of New England, in Biddeford Maine (USA).  Dr. Bove’s research has focused on the effect of inflammation on small diameter axons within peripheral nerves, a topic directed by founding chiropractic principles.  He also studies the effects of manual therapies on common painful conditions, such as repetitive motion disorders and postoperative visceral adhesions.

Visit Dr. Bove’s research gate profile.

Here are the links to Dr. Bove’s articles we discuss in this interview:

 

1. Time course of ongoing activity during neuritis and following axonal transport disruption.
Satkeviciute I, Goodwin G, Bove GM, Dilley A.
J Neurophysiol. 2018 May 1;119(5):1993-2000. doi: 10.1152/jn.00882.2017. Epub 2018 Feb 21.
PMID: 29465329 [PubMed – in process]
Similar articles
2. Group IV nociceptors develop axonal chemical sensitivity during neuritis and following treatment of the sciatic nerve with vinblastine.
Govea RM, Barbe MF, Bove GM.
J Neurophysiol. 2017 Oct 1;118(4):2103-2109. doi: 10.1152/jn.00395.2017. Epub 2017 Jul 12.
PMID: 28701542 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE] Free PMC Article
Similar articles
3. Attenuation of postoperative adhesions using a modeled manual therapy.
Bove GM, Chapelle SL, Hanlon KE, Diamond MP, Mokler DJ.
PLoS One. 2017 Jun 2;12(6):e0178407. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0178407. eCollection 2017.
PMID: 28574997 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE] Free PMC Article
Similar articles
4. A model for radiating leg pain of endometriosis.
Bove GM.
J Bodyw Mov Ther. 2016 Oct;20(4):931-936. doi: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.04.013. Epub 2016 Apr 14.
PMID: 27814877 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE] Free PMC Article
Similar articles
5. A Novel Method for Evaluating Postoperative Adhesions in Rats.
Bove GM, Chapelle SL, Boyle E, Mokler DJ, Hartvigsen J.
J Invest Surg. 2017 Apr;30(2):88-94. doi: 10.1080/08941939.2016.1229367. Epub 2016 Oct 3.
PMID: 27690703 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]
Similar articles
6. Manual therapy as an effective treatment for fibrosis in a rat model of upper extremity overuse injury.
Bove GM, Harris MY, Zhao H, Barbe MF.
J Neurol Sci. 2016 Feb 15;361:168-80. doi: 10.1016/j.jns.2015.12.029. Epub 2015 Dec 24.
PMID: 26810536 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE] Free PMC Article
Similar articles
7. Disruption of fast axonal transport in the rat induces behavioral changes consistent with neuropathic pain.
Dilley A, Richards N, Pulman KG, Bove GM.
J Pain. 2013 Nov;14(11):1437-49. doi: 10.1016/j.jpain.2013.07.005. Epub 2013 Sep 12.
PMID: 24035352 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]
Similar articles
8. Focal nerve inflammation induces neuronal signs consistent with symptoms of early complex regional pain syndromes.
Bove GM.
Exp Neurol. 2009 Sep;219(1):223-7. doi: 10.1016/j.expneurol.2009.05.024. Epub 2009 May 27.
PMID: 19477176 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]
Similar articles
9. Inflammation induces ectopic mechanical sensitivity in axons of nociceptors innervating deep tissues.
Bove GM, Ransil BJ, Lin HC, Leem JG.
J Neurophysiol. 2003 Sep;90(3):1949-55. Epub 2003 Apr 30.
PMID: 12724363 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE] Free Article
Similar articles
10. Disruption of axoplasmic transport induces mechanical sensitivity in intact rat C-fibre nociceptor axons.
Dilley A, Bove GM.
J Physiol. 2008 Jan 15;586(2):593-604. Epub 2007 Nov 15.
PMID: 18006580 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE] Free PMC Article
Similar articles

Ian Coulter, PhD, is a senior health policy analyst at the RAND Corporation, where he holds the Samueli Institute Chair in Policy for Integrative Medicine. He is a full professor in the School of Dentistry, UCLA, in the Division of Public Health and Community Dentistry; a professor at the Pardee RAND Graduate School; and a research professor at the Southern California University of Health Sciences.

Dr. Coulter has published over 200 articles, chapters and books. He is the past Vice President for Integrative Medicine at the Samueli Institute.  He has had numerous grants from NIH and the DoD. For the past 20 years he has taught ethics and research ethics at UCLA and to various professional bodies throughout the United States. He currently teaches Professional Ethics/Research Ethics in the Pediatric Dentist Residency Program at the UCLA School of Dentistry.

Dr. Coulter was born in New Zealand and holds degrees in sociology from the University of Canterbury (B.A., M.A. Honors) and the London School of Economics & Political Science (Ph.D.) and an honorary doctorate in humanities from the Southern California University of Health Sciences. He was a Pew Fellow at the RAND/ University of California at Los Angeles, Center for Health Policy Study from which he received a certificate in health policy analysis. Additional qualifications include a diploma in educational management from the Institute of Educational Management, Harvard University. He is also a past President of the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College.

And…more specifically regarding his research that relates to this interview, Dr. Coulter was an author of the recent JAMA article on adding chiropractic care to usual medical care, and lead author on the recent Spine Journal systematic review on spinal manipulation and chronic LBP. In addition, he is currently lead investigator of the CERC project (funded at over $8 million) to investigate chiropractors and their patients for Clinician Based Appropriateness, Outcomes Based Appropriateness, Patient Preferences Appropriateness and Resource Utilization Based Appropriateness.

View Dr. Coulter’s RAND page here.

How to cite this episode:
Smith DL. Chiropractic Science: Dr. Ian Coulter Discusses Research in JAMA, Appropriateness and Contextual Factors in Chiropractic Care [internet]. Eaton, Ohio; July 10, 2018. Podcast: 1:19:47. Available from: https://chiropracticscience.com/podcast/driancoulter/

Research discussed in this episode with Dr. Coulter include:

Goertz CM, Long CR, Vining RD, Pohlman KA, Walter J, Coulter I. Effect of Usual Medical Care Plus Chiropractic Care vs Usual Medical Care Alone on Pain and Disability Among US Service Members With Low Back PainA Comparative Effectiveness Clinical Trial. JAMA Network Open. 2018;1(1):e180105. 

Coulter ID, Crawford C, Hurwitz EL, Vernon H, Khorsan R, Suttorp Booth M, Herman PM. Manipulation and mobilization for treating chronic low back pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Spine J. 2018 May;18(5):866-879. 

Dr. Carolina Kolberg and I discuss her research dealing with the effect of chiropractic care on oxidative stress blood markers. Dr. Kolberg has a degree in chiropractic from the Anhembi Morumbi University in São Paulo, Brazil (2004), and she completed her Masters (2009) and PhD (2013) in Biological Sciences: Physiology at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS). Her research interests include the neurophysiology of pain and physiological effects of chiropractic treatment. Dr. Kolberg’s thesis on oxidative stress blood markers in patients with chronic back or neck pain treated with high-velocity and low-amplitude manipulation support the hypothesis that HVLA spinal manipulation leads to an antioxidant effect which, in turn, could be related to the analgesic response. Being the first chiropractor graduated in Brazil with a PhD, her goal is to promote the interest of Brazilians’ young chiropractors in research.

Dr. Kolberg is a member of the Research Committee of the WFC, is the Chair of the Research Committee of the Latin American Federation of Chiropractic (FLAQ) and a member of the editorial board of the Journal Coluna/Columna (ISSN 1808-1851), the official scientific publication of the Brazilian Spine Society and affiliated Societies. Dr. Kolberg is active in clinical practice; she is a Physiology professor at the University Center of the Serra Gaúcha (FSG) in the south of Brazil and is an associate researcher at the Neurobiology group from the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul.

View Dr. Kolberg’s research at researchgate.net.

Here are the research articles we discussed in this episode:

1. Peripheral oxidative stress blood markers in patients with chronic back or neck pain treated with high-velocity, low-amplitude manipulation.
Kolberg C, Horst A, Moraes MS, Duarte FC, Riffel AP, Scheid T, Kolberg A, Partata WA.
J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2015 Feb;38(2):119-29. doi: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2014.11.003. Epub 2014 Dec 5.
PMID: 25487299 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE] Free Article
Similar articles
2. Effect of high-velocity, low-amplitude treatment on superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities in erythrocytes from men with neck pain.
Kolberg C, Horst A, Moraes MS, Kolberg A, Belló-Klein A, Partata WA.
J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2012 May;35(4):295-300. doi: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2012.04.010.
PMID: 22632589 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]
Similar articles
3. Effects of high-velocity, low-amplitude manipulation on catalase activity in men with neck pain.
Kolberg C, Horst A, Kolberg A, Belló-Klein A, Partata WA.
J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2010 May;33(4):300-7. doi: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2010.03.002.
PMID: 20534317 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]
Similar articles

dr-mitch-haasDr. Mitch Haas and I discuss the dose-response relationship between chiropractic and health outcomes as well as chiropractors in public health. Dr. Haas has been an integral member of the research division at the University of Western States (UWS) since joining the faculty in 1987. He is now the associate vice president of research at UWS. Dr. Haas also serves as an adjunct associate professor in the neurology department at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU). Dr. Haas has been either principal investigator or co-investigator on more than 30 extramurally funded grants bringing more than $7 million in research funding to UWS. In 1994, he was a co-investigator on the first federal research grant ever awarded to a chiropractic college.

Dr. Haas has since become the principal investigator (PI) for a number of large federal grants awarded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (U.S.D.H.H.S.) Health and Resources Services Administration and the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine at the National Institutes of Health. These collaborative projects with OHSU and other institutions were designed to evaluate pain and disability outcomes and cost-effectiveness of chiropractic and medical treatment for low back pain, a chronic pain self-management program in the elderly, the relationship of the number of chiropractic treatments with health outcomes for low back pain and headaches and care of low back pain in adolescents.

Dr. Haas has been active in state and national public health associations. He was the founding chair of the Chiropractic Healthcare Section of the American Public Health Association (APHA) and has since served as chair of the APHA Intersection Council, a governing councilor, member of the APHA Executive Board and chair of the APHA Bylaws Committee. He was also the 2007 president of the Oregon Public Health Association (OPHA).

Check out Dr. Mitch Haas’s publications on researchgate.

Here are the articles we discuss in this podcast episode:

1. Dose-response of spinal manipulation for cervicogenic headache: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.
Hanson L, Haas M, Bronfort G, Vavrek D, Schulz C, Leininger B, Evans R, Takaki L, Neradilek M.
Chiropr Man Therap. 2016 Jun 8;24:23. doi: 10.1186/s12998-016-0105-z.
PMID: 27280016 [PubMed] Free PMC Article
Similar articles
2. Dose-response and efficacy of spinal manipulation for care of chronic low back pain: a randomized controlled trial.
Haas M, Vavrek D, Peterson D, Polissar N, Neradilek MB.
Spine J. 2014 Jul 1;14(7):1106-16. doi: 10.1016/j.spinee.2013.07.468.
PMID: 24139233 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE] Free PMC Article
Similar articles
3. Cost analysis related to dose-response of spinal manipulative therapy for chronic low back pain: outcomes from a randomized controlled trial.
Vavrek DA, Sharma R, Haas M.
J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2014 Jun;37(5):300-11. doi: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2014.03.002.
PMID: 24928639 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE] Free PMC Article
Similar articles
4. A path analysis of the effects of the doctor-patient encounter and expectancy in an open-label randomized trial of spinal manipulation for the care of low back pain.
Haas M, Vavrek D, Neradilek MB, Polissar N.
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2014 Jan 13;14:16. doi: 10.1186/1472-6882-14-16.
PMID: 24410959 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE] Free PMC Article
Similar articles