Podcast

Dr. John SrbelyListen to this great interview with Dr. John Srbely as we talk about his research interests in chiropractic, myofascial pain, myofascial trigger points and central sensitization.  Dr. Srbely is a researcher and Assistant Professor at the University of Guelph in the Department of Human Health and Nutritional Sciences.  He studies the physiologic mechanisms of myofascial trigger points and their role in the clinical expression and treatment of pain and joint/muscle dysfunction in chronic disease. A core theme to his research is the study of central sensitization which is a fundamental neuradaptive process associated with the pathophysiology of pain and disease.

Dr. Srbely’s research expertise and interests lie in the fields of clinical biomechanics and neurophysiology. He has a specific interest in the study of pain and joint function associated with aging and chronic disease such as osteoarthritis, myofascial pain and fibromyalgia. To this extent, he studies the physiologic mechanisms of myofascial trigger points and their role in the clinical expression and treatment of pain and joint/muscle dysfunction in chronic disease. A core theme to his research is the study of central sensitization. Central sensitization is a fundamental neuradaptive process associated with the pathophysiology of pain and disease, however, the impact of central sensitization on the physiologic expression of chronic myofascial pain and human mechanics/pathomechanics in chronic degenerative diseases such as osteoarthritis is poorly understood. Dr. Srbely’s research initiatives aim to develop novel/enhance existing treatment approaches in clinical pain management (diagnosis and treatment) and musculoskeletal biomechanics/pathomechanics associated with chronic diseases and aging.

View Dr. Srbely’s research at researchgate.net.

Here are some of the articles we discuss in this episode:

1.
Knowledge Transfer within the Canadian Chiropractic Community. Part 1: Understanding Evidence-Practice Gaps.

Kawchuk G, Bruno P, Busse JW, Bussières A, Erwin M, Passmore S, Srbely J.
J Can Chiropr Assoc. 2013 Jun;57(2):111-5.

PMID: 23754855 Free PMC article. No abstract available.

2.
Immediate effects of spinal manipulative therapy on regional antinociceptive effects in myofascial tissues in healthy young adults.

Srbely JZ, Vernon H, Lee D, Polgar M.
J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2013 Jul-Aug;36(6):333-41. doi: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2013.01.005. Epub 2013 Jul 3.

PMID: 23830709 Clinical Trial.

3.
Spinal manipulative therapy and its role in the prevention, treatment and management of chronic pain.

Srbely J.
J Can Chiropr Assoc. 2012 Mar;56(1):5-7.

PMID: 22457535 Free PMC article. No abstract available.

4.
Chiropractic science: a contemporary neurophysiologic paradigm.

Srbely J.
J Can Chiropr Assoc. 2010 Sep;54(3):144-6.

PMID: 20808613 Free PMC article. No abstract available.

5.
Capsaicin-induced central sensitization evokes segmental increases in trigger point sensitivity in humans.

Srbely JZ, Dickey JP, Bent LR, Lee D, Lowerison M.
J Pain. 2010 Jul;11(7):636-43. doi: 10.1016/j.jpain.2009.10.005. Epub 2009 Dec 16.

PMID: 20015704 Clinical Trial.

6.
Knowledge Transfer within the Canadian Chiropractic Community. Part 2: Narrowing the Evidence-Practice Gap.

Kawchuk G, Newton G, Srbely J, Passmore S, Bussières A, Busse JW, Bruno P.
J Can Chiropr Assoc. 2014 Sep;58(3):206-14.

PMID: 25202148 Free PMC article. No abstract available.

Dr. Bernadette MurphyListen to this great interview with Dr. Bernadette Murphy. This is an interview that all chiropractors and students will want to listen to! We talk about many interesting concepts such as the current state of neurophysiology research within chiropractic, neural adaptation in humans and the role of chiropractic adjustments in aiding the re-establishment of appropriate neuromuscular connections, how a chiropractic adjustment works and much more.  She is at the forefront of research regarding the neurophysiology of chiropractic.  Dr. Murphy graduated from Queens University in 1985 and the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College in 1989 before moving to New Zealand where she completed her MSc (1992) and PhD (1998) in Human Neurophysiology at the University of Auckland. She was a fulltime faculty member in the Department of Sport and Exercise Science from 1999-2007, where she established an MSc in Exercise Rehabilitation.  In January 2008, she returned to Canada and took on the role of Head of Kinesiology in the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT).  She is the Director of the Human Neurophysiology and Rehabilitation Laboratory. The overall theme of her research is neural adaptation in humans and the role of physical interventions such as spinal manipulation and exercise in aiding the re-establishment of appropriate neuromuscular connections.  She has previously been awarded the World Federation of Chiropractic best scientific paper award (1995) and 3rd prize in 2007; the New Zealand Chiropractor of the year (2004) and the 2010 Ontario Chiropractic Association award for most significant contributions to research.  She has supervised numerous award winning Masters and PhD students and received significant research funding in New Zealand, Australia and Canada.

Dr. Smith and Dr. Murphy at University of Ontario Institute of Technology

 Dr. Murphy and Dr. Smith at University of Ontario Institute of Technology

View Dr. Murphy’s research at researchgate.net.

Articles that we talk about in this episode include:

1.
The impact of cervical manipulation on heart rate variability.
Shafiq H, McGregor C, Murphy B.
Annu Int Conf IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc. 2014;2014:3406-9. doi: 10.1109/EMBC.2014.6944354.
PMID: 25570722
2.
The role of spinal manipulation in addressing disordered sensorimotor integration and altered motor control.
Haavik H, Murphy B.
J Electromyogr Kinesiol. 2012 Oct;22(5):768-76. doi: 10.1016/j.jelekin.2012.02.012. Epub 2012 Apr 6.
PMID: 22483612 Review.
3.
Alterations in cortical and cerebellar motor processing in subclinical neck pain patients following spinal manipulation.
Daligadu J, Haavik H, Yielder PC, Baarbe J, Murphy B.
J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2013 Oct;36(8):527-37. doi: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2013.08.003. Epub 2013 Sep 12.
PMID: 24035521
4.
Subclinical neck pain and the effects of cervical manipulation on elbow joint position sense.
Haavik H, Murphy B.
J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2011 Feb;34(2):88-97. doi: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2010.12.009.
PMID: 21334540
5.
Altered central integration of dual somatosensory input after cervical spine manipulation.
Taylor HH, Murphy B.
J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2010 Mar-Apr;33(3):178-88. doi: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2010.01.005.
PMID: 20350670
6.
Altered sensorimotor integration with cervical spine manipulation.
Taylor HH, Murphy B.
J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2008 Feb;31(2):115-26. doi: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2007.12.011.
PMID: 18328937